How to Submit Your Book to the Kindle E-Book Store

Published April 27, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

 

http://blogworkz.co.uk/how-to-submit-your-ebook-to-the-kindle-storeby Spanner Spencer, Demand Media

book by the KDP system.

Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

I confess I borrowed this one from Amazon Kindle (I think the directions are in public domain). However, since I goofed up royally the first time I self-pubishied a book, I think it’s worth presenting this. Amazon now has a paperback format that Indie authors can use directly on it’s site. However, I still do it the old way, because Create Space allows me to purchase author copies of my books at a discounted rate. The last time I looked this feature wasn’t available on Amazon.

Kindle is Amazon.com’s ebook publishing platform available on the Kindle ebook reader, on computers, online, for smartphones such as Android and iPhone, and for tablet devices such as the iPad. Anyone can publish a book through the Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) system, which then distributes the e-book via Amazon.com’s online network. The KDP system is compatible with a variety of document files and requires you to include a cover image for your e-book that will be displayed on the Kindle store.

Items you will need

  • com account
  • KDP-compatible e-book file (kindle book publishing compatible)
  • E-book cover image

Step 1

Go to the KDP Web page on your computerand log in using your Amazon.com account details. If requested, read and agree to the KDP terms and conditions.

Step 2

Click the “Add a New Title” button in the upper-left corner of the KDP “Bookshelf” page.

Step 3

Enter the relevant details of your e-book in the “Book Basics” section, including a title, edition number and product description. The description is the synopsis people will see when browsing the Kindle store.

Step 4

Click the “Add Contributors” button and enter the details of the e-book’s author or authors. Click the “Save” button to finish adding contributors.

Step 5

Set the language of the e-book using the “Language” drop-down menu in the “Publishing Details” section and set a publication date using the calendar to determine when the e-book will go on sale. If you want it to go on sale immediately, leave this section blank.

Step 6

Click the “Add Categories” button in the “Browse and Search” section and select at least one relevant category for your e-book to be filed under.

Step 7

Click the “Browse for Image” button in the “Product Image” section and select the cover image from your computer. Click the “Upload Image” button to add the cover image to your e-book.

Step 8

Select your preferred option for adding copy protection to the e-book in the “Book Content” section using the two radio buttons. Click the “Browse for Book” button and select the e-book file on your computer followed by the “Open” button. Your e-book will now be uploaded to Amazon.com and its digital rights management (DRM) will be applied.

Step 9

Click the “Save and Continue” button and then select your preferred royalty option on the next page using the two radio buttons. Enter the price you want to sell your e-book for in the “List Price” box next to the royalty options.

Step 10

Tick the “Terms and Conditions” box at the bottom of the page followed by the “Save and Publish” button. Your e-book will appear for sale on the Amazon.com Kindle store within the next 24 hours.

Tips & Warnings

How to Submit Your eBook to the Kindle Store

Submitting Your eBook to the Kindle Store

Getting your eBook on the Kindle format is a powerful way to get exposure to a group of people that may never actively search for your book online. You’ll be exposed to people who are ready and willing to spend money and can purchase your book quickly and easily at the click of a button.

Amazon’s process for submitting an eBook used to be long and complicated, requiring an ISBN number and a lengthy application process similar to its physical book process.

With the Kindle’s new Digital Text Platform (DTP) you can now submit your eBook to the Kindle quickly and easily. Here’s how.

Step 1: Sign In to the DTP

Go to: http://dtp.amazon.com

You’ll be presented with the introduction page. Sign in to your Amazon account.

Step 2: Add Seller Information

When you log onto the DTP system, you’ll immediately be presented with a screen that says “Your account information is incomplete.”

That’s because you currently have an account for buying books on Amazon but not for selling books on Amazon.

Click the “Update Now” button to give Amazon the necessary information to have an account that can submit books to the Kindle.

Step 3: Fill Out Your Account Information

page that should be mostly self-explanatory. Fill out your name, tax ID / SSN number and how you’d like to receive your payments.

Step 4: Add Your First eBook

Once you save your changes, you’ll be returned to the main screen. Click “Add a new title” to add your first eBook.

Step 5: Fill Out the Book Details

When you click the add button, you’ll be presented with a long page of options for your book. Here’s what each section means.

Provide the title of your book and the description. Remember that these are two of the most important things people will use to consider whether to buy your book or not. The title and description should be both descriptive and compelling.

2) Book contributors – Who are the authors?

3) Publishing Details – What language is the book in? Everything else is optional.

Do you own the rights or is the book in the public domain?

2) What category does the book belong in? This will help people who don’t know of your title find your book. If you’re unsure, look for books similar to yours and see what categories they put themselves in. You should also add a few keywords to make the book easier to find.

3) Your book cover. Perhaps more than any other factor, your book cover is what will catch attention and get people to buy your book.

4) Upload your book. Amazon prefers HTML format, though they can accept PDF format as well.

When you hit continue, you’ll be taken to the rights & pricing page:

Here you’ll set whether you want to sell the book all over the world or just in certain parts of the world. You’ll also set your royalty percentage and your listing price.

Once you hit submit, your book will be reviewed by Amazon. Once you receive approval, your eBook will be live on the Kindle store

 

  • The KDP system is compatible with e-books in Microsoft Word, plain text, Mobipocket and ePub file formats.

What You Need to Submit Your Book For Kindle Publishing

June 6, 2011

Information Marketing

We’ve talked why you should write a Kindle book, but we haven’t touched on just how easy it is to submit your manuscript for publication.

Unlike traditional publishing, there’s no need for an agent, you don’t have to submit your manuscript for consideration, and you don’t have to wait the months or even years it takes to have your book press-printed.

Instead, you just follow these simple steps:

  1. Go to https://kdp.amazon.com/self-publishing/signinand sign in using your Amazon account.
  2. Read and accept the terms of service.
  3. Click “Add a New Title” and enter your book details including:

-Book title
-Description
-Language, publication date, publisher, and ISBN (all optional)
-Verify your rights (whether the book is public domain, or you own the rights)
-Add categories and keywords to target your book
-Upload your book cover
-Upload your book file

  1. Determine Rights and Pricing, including:

-Publishing territories
-Royalties (35% or 70%)
-List price
-Kindle book lending

It’s really that easy! If your manuscript and cover are finished, the whole process can be completed in just a few minutes. Then you’ll wait for approval, which can occur as quickly as 24 hours.

Compare that to the year-plus that print authors must wait to see their books in the bookstore, and you’ll know why authors love the Kindle!

A note on formats: To publish to the Kindle, you must have your content in the right format.

Here are the supported formats for the Kindle:

-.zip
-.doc
-.pdf
-.epub
-.txt
-.mobi and .prc

A note on covers: Would you purchase a book from Barnes and Noble that had no cover, or had just a plain brown wrapper? Possibly, but probably not.

We’re visual creatures, and in the online world when you can’t pick up a book to leaf through it, the cover sells the book. Spend some time and money on getting your cover right.

When a customer is browsing the Kindle store in Amazon, you want your book cover to be professional and eye-catching.

Look at other book covers to see what appeals to you, and find a graphic designer who can assist you in creating the look you want.

Graphics don’t have to be expensive; try sources like fiverr.com, shelancer.com, and odesk.comfor graphics help.

 

 

PRESENTATION IS EVERYTHING!

Published April 20, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

 

By the Practical Artist

http://www.thepracticalartist.com/the-practical-artists-blog.php

A great many artistically talented young men and women become discouraged from pursuing an artistic career because agents and gallery owners won’t even consider their work. In many cases, this lack of interest on the part of galleries is not because the art is bad, but because the work is poorly prepared to be shown at a professional level. It is one of the purposes of most art groups to help teach these young artists how to frame their art for art shows and presentation to galleries so they can realize their potential as artists.

Presentation is everything!A poorly presented piece of artwork might as well take itself back to the studio. Would you buy a painting that was dirty, had dust on the frame, smears or scratches on the glass, ripped paper on the back? Would you want it if you cut yourself on sharp picture wire sticking out the back when you lifted it? Would you show up the prom in greasy jeans? When making a first impression, your art should put its best foot forward. When you take your art to an art show, a gallery or present it to a prospective client, it should be ready to hang on the wall. The Frame should glow with polish, if the painting is under glass, the glass should shine and be free from dust, scratches and smears. Oils and Acrylics should have been cleaned of dirt and dust with a soft, damp cloth.

All paintings should be framed; gallery wrap (1.5” to 2” wide on the edge) is acceptable.  Frames should be in good repair and ready to hang.  use flat hangers with wires only, no Saw-tooth, eyelet hangers or quick frames and no screw eyes. The ends of the wire should be taped or sleeved. Screws for hanging should be no more than 4” inches from the top of the frame and the wire should not show over the top of the frame. All oils should be completely dry. Watercolor, Pastel, Drawing and some types of mixed media should be under glass or plexi-glass.

Hanging wire should have the ends either taped or be enclosed in plastic sleeves. (Inexpensive tubing can be bought at the hardware store, cut in small lengths, and then slipped over the wire before you twist the wire around itself.) Why are shows and galleries so picky? Hangers should be strong enough to support the art. Shows and galleries don’t want to be responsible for damage to your frame if your art falls off the walls or show standards! Most shows require wires attached with a flat D-Hook and the ends of the wire taped or sleeved so they don’t cut or stab anyone. If you are planning to enter the art in a show, don’t use either sawtooth or screweye hangers. What’s wrong with them? The sawtooth hangers are usually not sturdy enough to hold a painting (besides being hard to fasten with most hanging systems) and the screw eyes stick out and can poke holes in the wall or standard behind the art!

CREATING A LIVING BREATHING ART COMMUNITY

Published April 13, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

By the Practical Artist

http://www.thepracticalartist.com/the-practical-artists-blog.php

To grow as artists, we must have viable, flourishing art communities to nurture our progress as artists. Here in the  Fresno/Clovis area alone we have at least five such art groups, and I can think of at least seven within driving distance of these cities! Sadly, dwindling membership has caused many of these valuable resources to cut back on their activities. Fewer artists are stepping up and maintaining our art community.  If you want to stop the drain of this valuable resource, stop sitting on the sidelines and actively look for an art group that meets your needs. When you find that group, look around and see how you can contribute to its healthy growth. If you are already a member of a group, make it one of your New Years Resolutions to become a more active member. Joining a local art group can be rewarding both personally and professionally. Why is it so important to associate with other artists? Well, although you can create art in a vacuum, if your art is never evaluated by your peers, you may simply be stuck repeating the same type of art and art subjects at the same skill level forever. Peer groups challenge us to stretch our skills, reach for new goals and generally provide support when we are feeling down. it is important to seek out those who are Sympatico with our ideals and feelings about our art. Local art groups can be irreplaceable in this area. Let’s face it, while our friends and family members may oohand ahhover our art, they really can’t provide an informed opinion about it. In addition, most of us suspect they are praising our art because they love us, and not really because they actually love our work or are really interested in art. While most of the same local artists also belonged to many of the groups, each group didhave a different “feel” to it, depending on the group’s mission statement and who was actually directing the groups focus.  In my area alone there are five or six art groups, all with different standards and goals. One of the associations is simply a painting group that gets together to talk, paint or draw and critique each other’s work twice a month. Another aims its standards for professionals and is very picky about what they accept in their shows. A third group is warm and welcoming to new and beginning artists and seeks to encourage its members to strive to improve their skills. A fourth group is a very loose association that tracks events from all the others and tries to find places for artists to exhibit and show. All of these groups have valuable insights into the local art world.

 

 Resolution 1—Improve myself and my art by joining one or more of the local art groups

 Resolution 2—Become an active member of each group I join

 Resolution 3— Remember that it is time to pay my yearly dues!

 

 

  1. Creating a viable Art Community
    1. What is?
  2. Our local art associations are dwindling in membership
    1. fewer younger artists are joining
      1. Activities/shows/workshops not geared to their interests
      2. Local Art is not promoted by us
    2. How can we change this
  3. Participation
    1. Develop a “how can I help mentality”
    2. Be willing to do your share
      1. Activities
      2. Meetings
  • Shows
  1. Workshops
  1. Leadership
    1. Positive attitude
    2. Look for a need
    3. Promotion
    4. Make suggestions
  2. To grow as an artist you must look outside your own needs
    1. Learn about new techniques
    2. Move into the modern world
  3. Growth happens subconsciously as well as consciously
    1. Stop being afraid

 

IS YOUR WORK READY FOR AN ART SHOW?

Published April 6, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

By the Practical Artist

http://www.thepracticalartist.com/the-practical-artists-blog.php

Art competitions add creditability to your portfolio. Entering and being accepted shows that you are serious about your art. It has the added benefit of exposure to the art world. If you are relatively unknown as an artist, an art show is one of the easiest ways to put your work in front of the maximum amount of people in a short space of time. You should pick your competitions wisely, however. Look at the events track record regarding your target market. If you are marketing your art to the illustrative market or decorative items (cups, plates, clothing), you should be entering shows or competitions that are in that industry not fine art competitions. Typically, most art competitions produce an entry form called a Prospectus. Read it carefully to make sure that your work will meet acceptance standards as to hanging requirements and other criteria given on the prospectus. And PLEASE, make sure your frame is clean and in good repair (a dusty, dirty frame shows a lack of respect for your own work!), if your work is under glass, take the time to clean the glass before bringing it to a show! Not doing these things is the equivalent of sending your children to a fancy party in the same clothes they raked leaves in!

An artist is most likely to hear a critique of their work at a juried show. Are you and emotionally prepared to have your work criticized or perhaps not accepted? Entering a juried show means you are putting your art out there to be judged. You should always enter what you consider being your best work to date. Keep in mind though that your art may not be accepted into the show. Does this mean you are a poor artist? Or that your art is “bad”? Not necessarily. A juried art show is a subjective format and there are many reasons your art might not have been accepted. It may mean that the space to display art was limited. Perhaps the art was good, but your presentation (framing/matting) detracted from your art and the judge preferred art that was better presented. Or maybe this just wasn’t your best work. Just because a show is classed as “open” might not mean they are looking for your type of art to represent their show. If you are entering a show that caters to representational art and your art falls into another genre such as abstract or illustration, perhaps you need to look for art shows and venues that appreciate the art you create.

If your art wasn’t accepted by the judge into the show, you might have an artist whose opinion you respect critique the work for you. Informed criticism can be helpful. Please do note that I said “Informed” criticism; the person who does the critiquing should be a more experienced artist with some knowledge of technique and the principles of art. We love them, but the opinions of our friends and family who know no more than we do about art aren’t useful as critiques.

In some local shows, the judge may offer critiques as they judge, and a member of the art group putting on the show will follow the judge and write what is said. If you would like the judge to critique your work, approach the show chair as ask if this is permissible. If the judge offers a critique of your work, please pay attention. This person was highly enough thought of by your local art peers to be paid to make choices and approve or disapprove the art presented to him or her. Above all, don’t take this rejection personally. If the judge doesn’t offer critiques while they are judging, (some of them prefer to do this privately) sometimes it is permissible to privately approach the judge and politely ask them what they liked or disliked about your work. If the judge is gracious enough to do this, always thank him or her, and please, please, don’t argue with their opinion even if you don’t agree with it.

Nationally known artists get rejected from shows as well. Sometimes the judge just doesn’t like the subject or maybe he/she doesn’t care for the colors, or the shape, etc. Above all however, trust your own instincts. If you feel a piece of art is good, don’t give up on it, enter it into another show with a different judge and see if you get a different decision.

 

Art Is A Business

Published January 8, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Art is a business as well as a creative endeavor. Losing your art can be a financial loss. So can not being aware you are losing money because you don’t keep track of costs.

Over a lifetime, all of us will probably create hundreds of pieces of art and maybe hundreds of books. When first starting out, it may seem a waste of time to develop this kind of recordkeeping, but when you are trying to remember which landscape of Monterey or which painting of magnolias out of the 15 you painted in the past 20 years that you entered into a show, you will come to see the value of good records.   If you keep a record and the Art information sheet updated you will always have a documentation of your work and where it has been.

However, if you keep good records you probably won’t lose track of your art and try and re-enter art into a show you have already exhibited in. (This can be very embarrassing when the show director calls you  to pick up your artwork and then complains that you keep entering the same piece year after year.)

 

Art Information Worksheet

 

100 Best Blogs for Book Reviews

Published January 1, 2018 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Update: 2017 12 10 -THIS WAS FREE TO Share this page with your friends, and still is, however, since it was done in 2009, I can’t swear that all the blogs are active now. FYI: most of these bloggers do have specific formats for review submissions. Please be courteous and obey the rules. Gail

It seems that a large number of book fanatics love to write about what they’ve read almost as much as doing the actual reading. That’s a good thing for the rest of the readers out there, because blogs about books are an excellent way to discover great books without wasting your valuable time on the bad ones. Along with reading top book review blogs, students are exposed to excellent classic and contemporary books through traditional and online master’s degrees in English literature. Check out these blogs that are all dedicated to reviewing books.

September 15th, 2009 written by

Staff Writers

General Fiction Reviews

These blogs feature book reviews across many different fiction categories such as classics, world literature, literary fiction, mystery, young adult, and more. The books read by these bloggers go beyond what you’d come across in typical English degree programs.

  1. Becky’s Book Reviews. Becky reviews all sorts of fiction ranging from classics to science fiction to young adult fiction.
  2. books i done read. Get plenty of witty humor with the book reviews on this blog.
  3. bookshelves of doom. This prolific reader reviews books of all kinds and includes the source of her books as well.
  4. Absorbed in Words. The reviews here have an emphasis on books translated from Japanese, but include many other fiction books too.
  5. Bookdwarf. A frontlist buyer at the Harvard Book Store, this book lover writes reviews on literature, book covers, and much more on her blog.
  6. Hey Lady! Whatcha Readin’?. Check out the literary fiction reviews here that come with ratings from 1-100.
  7. Here There be Books. Anastasia blogs mostly about fiction in young adult, fantasy, sci-fi, and adventure. BLOG HAS GONE PRIVATE – DON’T BOTHER
  8. Books and Musings from Downunder. The reviews here include tons of helpful information such as genre, opening sentence, and rating (A+, A, B, C, D).
  9. It’s all about me (time). These books cross genres ranging from chick lit to classics to world literature.
  10. Lynda’s Book Blog. This Welsh blogger reviews all types of books including thrillers, world literature, mysteries, classics, and even some non-fiction.
  11. Peachybooks. Blogging from Britain, many of the books Jo writes about here are from or about the UK.
  12. Stephanie’s Confessions of a Book-a-holic. Stephanie participates in many book challenges and posts about them all on her blog.
  13. The Book Nest. The books here tend to more young adult and fantasy, but a wide range of other genres are also covered due to the many challenges and book tours in which Corinne participates. The Book Nest Review Policy I do occasionally read review copies.  I am much more prone to accept your book if it is in the young adult genre.  I will give every book I read 50 pages to catch my attention.  I don’t review books that I put down at 50 pages but I review every book I finish and always give a fair and balanced review here on my blog.  I also post all my reviews on Goodreads, Facebook and Shelfari.  Feel free to submit to booknestreviews at gmail dot com.
  14. The Boston Bibliophile. Literary fiction, Jewish fiction and non-fiction, and graphic novels are all reviewed here.
  15. Caribousmom. The books reviewed here are generally literary fiction, mystery, and historical novels.
  16. Rhapsodyinbooks’s Weblog. Written by a husband and wife team, this blog covers all sorts of fiction.
  17. Whimpulsive. Mystery, young adult, memoirs, and historical fiction are just a few of the genres represented among these reviews.
  18. Rose City Reader. This prolific reviewer also includes links to other reviews–providing you with lots of information about books.
  19. Worducopia. Books and writing both get billing on this blog that features lots of fiction with some non-fiction also included.
  20. We Be Reading. K and Z are a mom and son team (with mom doing most of the actual writing) that cover both adult and children’s literature.
  21. A Work in Progress. Biographies, historical fiction, mysteries, and more show up on this blog.
  22. things mean a lot. The books reviewed here include historical fiction, general fiction, YA, graphic novels, and more.
  23. Books on the Nightstand. This blog features not only a variety of genres from graphic novels to “bathroom reading” to classics, it also offers options for how to get the book reviews with both written reviews and podcasts.

Children and Young Adult Reviews

Children’s literature and young adult literature are the focus of these blogs.

  1. Guys Lit Wire. This blog features books that are of interest to teenage boys.
  2. a wrung sponge. Get reviews of children and young adult literature and poetry as well as books for parents here.
  3. Book Nut. Melissa reviews adult fiction as well here, but the bulk of her posts are on children’s and young adult literature. She includes age ranges on each, too.
  4. Bookworm 4 Life. Written by a librarian at a public library, the books here focus mostly on teen literature.
  5. SherMeree’s Musings. This children’s and teen’s librarian reviews books from these categories. Reviews include number of pages, appropriate age range, and publishing information.
  6. Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast. While not following the traditional book review format, this blog gives the low-down on authors, illustrators, and the books themselves from this genre.
  7. A Fuse #8 Production. Check out this blog for in-depth reviews of kid lit.
  8. Jen Robinson’s Book Page. Jen writes reviews about kid lit and includes age ranges, publication information, and sources of her books.
  9. Maw Books Blog. YA fiction, kid lit, and even a bit of historical fiction and author interviews end up on this blog.
  10. Shelf Elf: read, write, rave. Children’s and young adult’s books are featured on this blog as well as news and updates about books and authors in this field.
  11. GreenBeanTeenQueen. If you are looking for reviews on teen and tween literature, then let this librarian guide you with her reviews.
  12. The Book Cellar. The reviews of YA literature here are done by the 16 year-old blogger who posts a short excerpt from the book along with her review and a rating based on a 5-star system.
  13. Pop Culture Junkie. While most of the books here are YA, there are also reviews on other types of fiction as well.
  14. The Story Siren. The YA reviews here include a star rating system for separate components of each book, including overall, plot, characters, ending, writing, and cover.
  15. Tempting Persephone…. Written by a young adult librarian, the books here have a decidedly fantasy/alternate reality bent to them.

Collaborative Blogs

These blogs share the reviewing work with some blogs having many reviewers and others only a few. The differing perspectives from them offer a wider range of opinion.

  1. 26 books. What started as one reader reviewing 26 books in one year has grown to multiple reviewers and hundreds of books.
  2. BookFetish. This collaborative blog features reviews on mysteries and thrillers, young adult, fantasy, and more.
  3. Omnivoracious’ Amazon Blog. A collaborative effort from Amazon.com, this blog covers everything from cook books to fiction.
  4. The New Book Review. Readers, reviewers, and authors can submit their reviews here which cover a wide variety of genres.
  5. Book Nook Club. These 13 book reviewers cover many different genres and encourage their readers to leave comments to for further discussion.
  6. Five Borough Book Review. A group of 20-something New Yorkers, they review books as varied as they are.
  7. Shelf Love. Jenny and Teresa review everything from classics to contemporary fiction to children’s literature.

Industry and Professional Reviewers

From national newspapers to web magazines, these blogs provide reviews from professionals.

  1. ArtsBeat. This blog from the New York Times looks at books, their authors, and news surrounding both.
  2. Book Soup Blog. Book Soup is a book store in Los Angeles and they include reviews of new literature on this blog.
  3. New York Review of Books. The reviews here focus on non-fiction books covering topics such as health care, politics, and more.
  4. A Different Stripe. These reviews are from The New York Review of Books Classics.
  5. Blog of a Bookslut. The blog from this popular web magazine covers book reviews and book news.
  6. Critical Mass. From National Book Critics Circle Board of Directors, this blog not only features a wide variety of book reviews, but also news from the publishing industry.
  7. Jacket Copy. This blog from the LA Times features book reviews and other publishing and book news.

History and Historical Fiction

Fans of history and historical fiction will love these blogs, which provide a great diversion for those pursuing graduate degrees in history.

  1. Carla Nayland Historical Fiction. Carla writes about her favorite genre, historical fiction, on her blog.
  2. Age 30+…A Lifetime of Books. Memoirs and historical fiction both feature on this mom’s blog, with the occasional kid lit, too.
  3. A Reader’s Respite. Don’t expect any kind of dry account of historical fiction on this blog where high camp is king.
  4. Steven Till. Historical fiction, medieval history terms of the week, and a good dose of fantasy are all included on this blog.
  5. TOCWOC – A Civil War Blog. This blog is all about the Civil War and reviews mostly non-fiction works.
  6. News and Random Musings about Historical Novels. This blog from HistoricalNovels.info includes plenty of book reviews.
  7. Historical Tapestry. This collaborative blog features historical novels from several different eras.
  8. Julie K. Rose. Written by a historical novelist, this blog shares book reviews, definitions of obscure words, and sneak peeks at books-in-progress.
  9. Writing the Renaissance. While writing her own historical fiction novel, this blogger also reviews books and talks about renaissance history.
  10. The Biblio Blogazine. Historical fiction is this blogger’s book of choice, but you may see other types of books reviewed here too.
  11. Bookfoolery and Babble. Lots of different types of books are reviewed here, but historical fiction and history books tend to surface the most.

Mystery and Thriller

Whether mystery, crime, or thrillers are your thing, these blogs will offer plenty of great suggestions for you.

  1. Kittling: Book. Mysteries and thrillers feature highly here, but you can also find a smattering of historical fiction and biographies too.
  2. Bookgasm. Crime, mystery, thrillers, and even a bit of non-fiction turn up on this blog.
  3. Jen’s Book Thoughts. Jen reviews mystery novels and also includes author interviews.
  4. The Drowning Machine. Mystery and crime novels are the focus of this blog. Recent posts have featured a short story contest they’ve been running, but the book reviews should be back soon.

Romance

Romance novels seem to beckon a variety of different review styles and these blogs highlight some of the best.

  1. The Book Smugglers. Romance and fantasy books are both featured on this blog–and bonus points for romance fantasy books.
  2. Book Binge. These three women blog about their passion for romance novels.
  3. RipMyBodice.com. The three women here write reviews of romance novels and don’t take themselves too seriously.
  4. Babbling About Books, and More. Not only does KB babble about romance novels, she also has fun with words and silly photos.
  5. Gossamer Obsessions. This blogger offers an enjoyable breakdown of the cast of characters and the traditional romance novel devices used in the reviews here.
  6. Racy Romance Reviews. Here you’ll find a philosophy professor who reads romance novels and blog about the books themselves and the genre.
  7. ReadingAdventures. Romance and historical fiction are found on this blog.
  8. Smart Bitches, Trashy Books. These two smart women review romance novels and give them a grade from A+ to F.

Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Adventure

If you like your books a little out of this world, then check out these blogs that feature science fiction, fantasy, and adventure.

  1. BestScienceFictionStories.com. Science fiction short stories and novelettes are reviewed on this blog.
  2. Exclusively Books. Written by a group of Latter-day Saint women, these books are mostly fantasy and adventure. The ladies warn of bad language and adult content, too.
  3. Stuff as Dreams are Made On…. Chris enjoys reading and reviewing fantasy, sci-fi, YA, and even a bit of general fiction.
  4. Bold. Blue. Adventure.. Sci-fi and fantasy are the favorites here, along with a good dose of YA and graphic novels.
  5. The Book Pirate. While not all the books reviewed here are about pirates, it doesn’t hurt if they feature zombies, fantasy, or sea monsters.
  6. The Book Zombie. Eerie seems to be the tone of most of these books, which may include young adult and adult literature.
  7. bombastic bagman. These book reviews tend to fantasy and alternate realities. Comics and mysteries that overlap with fantasy are also represented.
  8. Bibliophile Stalker. This blog looks at books from the speculative fiction and fantasy genre.
  9. SciFiGuy.ca. SciFiGuy reviews focus on urban fantasy, paranormal romance, and speculative fiction and fantasy.
  10. The Galaxy Express. Science fiction romance is the genre de jour at this blog.

Graphic Novels and Comic Books

It’s time to take this genre seriously, and these blogs are a great way to learn about it.

  1. Jog – The Blog. Manga, old-fashioned comics, and graphic novels are just a few of the genres reviewed here.
  2. The Weekly Crisis. Get comic book reviews here from four reviewers that include Moments of the Week, Cover of the Week, manga, and more.
  3. Warren Peace Sings the Blues. Comics of all varieties, including manga, are reviewed here.

Unique Genres

From book covers to regional authors to terrible books, these blogs offer a perspective that’s a bit different from the rest.

  1. The Book Design Review. This blog proves you can judge a book by its cover. This blog is all about the design of books.
  2. Reading Local: Portland. Focusing on the literary world in Portland, Oregon, this blog features reviews of books by Portland authors as well as other news and events in the area.
  3. In Spring it is the Dawn. This Canadian blogger has been living in Japan for about 8 years and reviews a steady stream of books from Japanese writers or set in Japan.
  4. YA Fabulous. This blog reviews and discusses young adult books with GLBT themes.
  5. Awful Library Books. Two librarians have made it their mission to weed out terrible books that are actually on library shelves. See which ones they select on this blog.
  6. Judge a Book by its Cover. In the vein of awful books, this blog features books with really bad covers. Beware of some adult content.

Mixed Bag of Genres

These blogs cover a wide variety of genres and even stretch out into reviews of other mediums such as movies.

  1. Blog | Book Dads. This blog highlights books about dads and their relationships with their children. Adult, young adult, and children’s literature are all reviewed.
  2. Books, Movies and Chinese Food. Most of the books reviewed by this grad student are Christian fiction.
  3. it’s dark in the dark. This blog features scary books and rates them on creepy factor, suspense factor, weird erotic tension factor, and funny and/or strange factor.
  4. Dreadlock Girl Reads. Dreadlock Girl reviews everything from literary fiction to non-fiction to movies.
  5. S. Krishna’s Books. World literature book reviews are featured along with music and photography on this blog.
  6. The Bottom of Heaven. While book reviews are a large part of this blog, it also shares plenty of information and insight about black culture in America.

CHOOSING A GALLERY

Published December 25, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Choosing a gallery is NOT a matter of taking the first offer you get from a gallery, or taking a recommendation from your Uncle’s cousin. It is also not about showing trust in humanity. Choosing a Gallery to represent art can be one of the most important decisions an artist can make. This decision will affect who sees the art, and consequently who buys it. An artist is an equal partner with the Gallery: The artist supplies the product sold and the Gallery in turn supplies the selling venue. Neither party can exist without the other. If an artist chooses poorly, it reflects on both the artist and on the art. Art is a business as well as a creative endeavor.  If an artist is pursuing art as a career and not as a hobby artists need to be aware of legal issues that can affect them. Most artists benefit from showing their art at Commercial Galleries (nuts and bolts). Unfortunately, not all commercial galleries are created equal. Some are aboveboard and have excellent reputations and ethics. Others do not. Commercial art galleries derive their profit from sales of artwork, and thus take great care to select art and artists that they believe will sell and enhance their gallery’s reputation. They spend time and money cultivating collectors. If the artwork sells, the gallery makes a profit and the artist is then paid. It is not unusual for a commercial art gallery to charge a 50% commission on sales. Before entering into partnership with a new gallery, the artist should do what any responsible person would do before entering into a contract: check it out with the local Better Business Bureau and Chamber of Commerce. Ask to speak to other artists who are under contract. Do they make sales? Does the gallery pay on time when a sale is made? Does the gallery make sales of an artist’s work and not tell artists about it? What about advertising and publicity, how much does the gallery does and who pays for it? Artists should also attend a few of their receptions or events and see who is attending. If it is mostly other artists under contract, very few sales will be made. A successful commercial gallery will be in a location where there is a high volume of foot traffic and visited by a lot of art fans is ideal. A location such as this may be pricey, but if an audience is already there and primed to visit the gallery with the intent to buy, less can be spent on advertising to drive buyers to see the work.

NUTS & BOLTS VS. ON-LINE GALLEIRES

Surprisingly there are a number of on-line and nuts and bolts alternatives for choosing where you will show your art. The words “on-line art gallery” can mean different things, however; an online art gallery most likely will be a website to display and sell art. For example: 1) An on-line art gallery can be displaying art work from their current, future, or past exhibitions, and be set up to promote the exhibition rather than to sell the work via the website.  2)  An artist presenting his/her own gallery, either on his own website and 3) Multi-Artist Sites or shared websites (ArtId, Fine Art America, Etsy, etc.), representing many artists working in different medias and genres. On a multi-artist site the artist either pays a monthly fee or agrees to a commission paid when the work is sold. These are usually non-exclusive and are a risk free opportunity for the artist to sell art worldwide. Search for them using “original art” or “online art gallery”. The advantage of Online Galleries is that while the art buying public is growing, many people are still intimidated by walk-in commercial Art Galleries. If a potential buyer has access to a wide range of art viewed in the comfort and safety of their own home, they may relax and make a purchase. A lot of artists now have an online Gallery as well as a walk-in commercial Gallery, which means that an artist can present a lot more art to a lot more people.

Beginning artists can be confused by Vanity Galleries because Vanity Galleries are not the only type of gallery that charges a fee to the artist; a vanity gallery charges artists fees to exhibit their work and makes most of its money from the artists rather than from sales to the public. Some vanity galleries charge a lump sum to arrange an exhibition, while others ask artists to pay regular membership fees and then promise to organize an exhibition with a certain period. Occasionally a vanity gallery will appear to have a selection process because the number of artists on the membership roster cannot exceed the available time slots for shows. Vanity galleries have no incentive to sell art, as they have already been paid by the artist. They are not selective because they don’t have to be. Most Professional critics and reviewers tend to avoid them.

Cooperative galleries (sometimes called artist-run initiatives), are galleries operated by groups of artists who pool their resources to staff the gallery, pay for gallery space, exhibits and publicity. Most cooperative galleries carefully jury their members. Also, most, galleries of this type do require membership fees. Sometimes members must share the overhead cost of operating the gallery.

Before joining a gallery or on-line site, it is a good idea to check out their sales record. Talk or e-mail artists using the site and ask their opinion of the Gallery.

 

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