business of art

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DOES ACRYLIC PAINT REALLY DRY TOO FAST?

Published December 11, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Acrylic is a very forgiving medium. By this, I mean that if you goof up you can just paint over it and start again! Can’t do that with watercolor; at least not unless you are very, very skilled with it. I do love the way a talented watercolorist can bring a painting to life with watercolor, but sadly, I find it much harder to work with than acrylics. I am a kind of “create as I go painter”, and with watercolor it seems necessary to minutely plan each step. I am the type of artist who starts with just a general sketch and then details with paint as I go. While I like the way oils look (my mother worked in them) I can’t use them because of the chemicals and the smell. Oils also dry too slowly for a painter like me. I end up with mud every time because I am too impatient to wait days until my canvas is workable again! Pastels and charcoal make fantastic mediums when done by an artist skilled in their use, and they don’t stink but I am such a messy painter that I inevitably end up with as much on me as I do on the canvas or paper!

Acrylics are wonderful for impatient painters like me. Since each layer will dry and be workable in about a half hour, in four or five hours I can add at least four layers of paint without creating mud which every artist dreads. (You know when you’ve accidentally mixed your colors on top of each other and ended up with a dark mess instead of the beautiful color you were aiming for?)  I confess that it puzzles me to hear of other artists complaining that acrylics dry too fast to work with since I often have to stop and walk away for that half hour in order to let my painting become dry enough to add another layer of paint.

Acrylics paint is such a chameleon that if I want parts of my work to look like a watercolor, I just thin my acrylic paint to make it more transparent. There are many additions that can be used to alter the properties of Acrylics, but I just use water to thin my paint. If I want an area I am working on to stay wet a little longer, instead of adding a slow-dry medium, I spray the canvas with water or wet it with a brush. I don’t use any of the available mediums that are supposed to slow down the speed in which acrylics dry. I have tried them but I didn’t like working with them.

Acrylics typically dry darker and less shinny than they look when wet. There are mediums you can mix with your paints to give acrylics that shinny appearance typical of an oil painting, but this medium does slightly alter the way in which acrylic paint acts when painting with it. The same effect can be achieved if you simply apply a coat of varnish to the painting when it is done.

The amount of paint an artist applies to the painting also has an effect on how fast an acrylic application will dry. I have noticed that many artists who received their first artistic training in transparent watercolor seem to put a lot less paint on a canvas each time than I do, which might account for their acrylics drying faster than they expect. I find that acrylic loves to be applied nice and thick. The thicker the paint (the more you start out with on the brush each time) the easier it is to push it around on the canvas and the longer it will take to dry.

If you are having trouble with acrylic painting techniques, don’t give up. If you can’t find a class in acrylics by a local expert, there are many wonderful instruction videos and books available. You can also take advantage of your local art groups demonstrations at their general meetings. The two experts in Acrylic painting that I have learned the most from are Jerome Grimmer, an artist who lives in my area part time and gives workshops when he is in Fresno, and Jerry Yarnell, who lives in Oklahoma and publishes instructional videos that can be found on public television stations or bought from the internet.

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PERFORMANCE AND PROPERTIES OF ACRYLIC PAINTS IN FINE ART

Published December 4, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Acrylic paintings now make up a significant part of the permanent collections of museums and art galleries.  Artists’ acrylic paint was introduced in the 1950s and since then has dominated the arts and crafts market.   In addition, it has been accepted by artists as a viable alternative to oil paint.  Unlike oil paints, which have existed for centuries, Acrylic paints are a relatively new medium. Once dry, acrylic paint is not water-soluble and will usually be dry within 30 minutes of application, whereas oils do not become dry to the touch for 48 hours. Most acrylic paint used by artists is water-based. There is a form of acrylic paint that is solvent based, but it is not in general use by artists. A variety of additives can be added to the acrylic paint to make them easier to work with or to give the texture wanted by the artist.   Examples of these are thickeners, stabilizers, preservatives, and merging solvents.

Because it is a 20th century product, artists don’t have centuries of experience to tell what effect aging may have on an acrylic painting. Acrylic colors retain their original brilliance as long, or longer, than traditional oil paints, and they are much less delicate and prone to damage by UV radiation than watercolors and other water-based paints. The surface of a finished acrylic painting does not seem to become brittle or yellow with age, but remains flexible, insoluble and stable.

The behavior of acrylics as a painting medium and their physical and chemical properties are different from oil paint and merit different strategies in caring for acrylic paintings.  Some traditional conservation methods can in fact cause damage to the acrylic paintings.  The aging characteristics of acrylic paintings are just beginning to be understood.  It is known that aging may cause some acrylic paintings to form a grey veil on their surface or develop yellow discoloration. The soft film formed by acrylic paint will easily abrade or dent with just fingernail pressure.  This type of damage can ruin the appearance of paintings that should display a perfect surface. Because Acrylic paint stretches when exposed to heat and cold, Acrylic paintings are expected to develop fewer cracks than oil paintings when they age. Acrylic paintings can withstand much greater forces without breaking.   Cracks can form in acrylic paintings however. When exposed to sub-zero temperatures, acrylics become increasingly brittle and crack so don’t store your acrylic paintings in a freezer!

Acrylic paintings have unique qualities that need diligent preventive care to avoid long-term damage.  Acrylic paint attracts and holds dirt and is difficult to clean. Varnishing to protect the paint is not a perfect solution either.  It is imperative to store acrylic paintings in a dust free, smoke free location to reduce the amount of dirt accumulated.  It is also important to keep the display or storage temperature below standard room temperatures to reduce further softening of the paint film.  One might have to accept that acrylic paintings will experience some visual change due to dirt as time goes on. Avoid handling the painting’s surface directly. Erosion from scuffing or touching the paint surface can damage or alter the appearance of the work significantly. This is because skin oils are acidic and can damage the artwork over time. Dust and dirt are a particular hazard. Acrylics can also pick up mold residue if they are stored in a warm climate like a bathroom or locker room, or even a kitchen.

At present, there is no completely satisfactory solution to the problem of cleaning acrylic paintings. Removal of the top most dirt layer is perceived to be easier on a varnished painting. Varnishes provide surface protection from abrasion, dust and dirt. Varnishing acrylic paintings has problems attached to it. Natural varnishes, such as dammar, will yellow in time and the solvent used in their removal will dissolve or soften the acrylic paint layer, thus damaging your painting. A water-soluble varnish may be an answer; however, this is still being researched by manufacturers to see what long-term effects may take place. Instead, it is important to store acrylic paintings in a dust free environment to reduce the amount of dirt deposited while keeping the display or keep the temperature below standard room temperatures to reduce further softening of the paint film.

DON’T BE AFRAID TO PROMOTE YOUR WORK!

Published November 27, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Some of you may feel guilty about promoting sales of your work. For those of you who do feel guilty about telling friends, past customers, family and acquaintances “Hey, consider buying from me when selecting art for your home or office or buying a book as a gift, let’s consider a few things. Do you know what the 80/20 Rule is? Well it says that 80% of money spent locally stays in circulation locally. By promoting the idea of buying your art, you are contributing to the health of your neighborhood! When someone buys art from you, they provide you with money, which you in return spend on groceries, rent, clothing and other stuff (which hopefully you also bought in a local business!)

Sales tax spent with you supports local infrastructure, police, fire and schools. Money stays with the community when spent in local businesses. The Tax Policy Center: (click here for the entire article), says, “Local governments received transfers from both the federal and state governments equal to about one-seventh of total revenue. From their own sources, they collected about $700 billion, or 17 percent of all government revenue.” When your friends and family buy from you, they are helping to return money to their local economy, so you should feel no hesitation in pointing out to them that your work can be a resource for their decorating projects!

Spending money locally shows pride in their community culture and local products. As a person who lives in the area you are more apt to locally recirculate money your friends’ family and acquaintances spent with you on your art in the form of purchases from other local business, thus supporting the local work force. When you give some of that money to local charities, even if it is just the local boy or Girl Scout troop, or maybe the local food bank, you are keeping money spent with you in movement. It’s a fiscal circle that keeps people working to make the stuff they and others buy.

“I’m an artist/writer, not a business person”, you shout. Well, I hate to break this to you, but anyone who wants to sell his or her art or books is in business. According to Wikipedia, “a business (also known as enterprise or firm) is an organization or person engaged in the trade or sale of goods, services, or both to consumers”. Q.E.D. Business is NOT a dirty word. Businesses allow us as consumers to buy food, clothes, and gas. It allows us to find a place to live (real estate sales and rentals), and most likely it employs a lot of us who are not fortunate enough to be able to make a living selling our work. OOPS! There is that word “sell” again.

Local Business Can Support Local Artists and Writers

  • Local business can provide a mutual support base by being willing to allow artists and writers to display their work for sale in their stores and offices. The artist or writer will come in to see their art and most likely buy something from the business. They will also promote the business by telling their sphere of friends and family about having art or books on display in the business and urging them to come and see it.
  • Allowing creative people to promote shows, book signings, sales and event by displaying flyers in local business helps develop a mutual dependency.

Local Artists Offer

1 on 1 personal contact with artist/writer
Cachet to

Home/office

Unique Versatile gifts for each individual
Mutual

Support Base

Buy Art

or Books From Local Writers  & Artists

and artists

What value does the community receive when they purchase art from a local artist rather than from a national chain store?

  • Well-made handcrafted items give a cachet to their office, home and gift giving. When giving gifts it shows the buyer not only thought enough of the person receiving the gift to take into account that person’s personal tastes, but also took the time to check the gift out carefully.
  • Buying art and books from local artists and writers gives the opportunity for a one-on-one personal experience and gives buyers an opportunity to develop a personal and professional relationship with the artist or writer.
  • Books and Art are individually created unique, versatile items. Why buy something indistinguishable from what everyone else is buying?

What YOU As The Artist Or Writer Can Do To Promote Sales In Your Neighborhood This Holiday Season:

  • Remind past clients, friends, and family, church and organization members that you are a resource for buying holiday gifts or décor items.
  • Offer items for sale as “Sales specials”.
  • Offer a bonus or discount off a future purchase if the buyer refers another buyer who actually purchases your work. This type of promotion is done all the time in other industries; it is sometimes called a “referral commission’. No money is actually paid until the other buyer makes his/her purchase and mentions the name (or brings in a coupon) of the referring buyer.
  • Artists can adapt some art into small affordable reproductions (cards, small prints, puzzles, ornaments, cups, etc.) for sale at a holiday boutique or Studio Open House.
  • Writers can arrange book signings at local boutiques, stores or other holiday events.
  • Send past clients, friends and neighboring businesses postcards showing your work and invite them to view it in person at a local book signing, show or gallery.
  • Take advantage of the local Art Scene by inviting a selected few to come with you on Art Hop nights and show them to galleries where your work is being sold.

DO I NEED INSURANCE?

Published November 20, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

If you have a professional studio or gallery outside your home you probably will need additional coverage for fire and theft for that space. If you have events (open gallery nights, art shows, classes, etc.) then you will probably also need liability insurance to cover anyone attending events there. You should discuss the amount of coverage you will need with your insurance carrier.

DO I NEED ADDITIONAL COVERAGE IF I AM WORKING OUT OF MY HOME?

The answer to that is maybe. Unless your homeowners insurance has an exclusion forbidding you to work out of your home, you probably are covered for fire and theft since the art you create can be considered personal property. If you need to make a claim, the carrier will require documentation. That is why it is important to keep good records of what you painted. You should consult your insurance carrier as to how much they will cover for each art piece. Don’t make assumptions and get stuff in writing!

HOW DO YOU FIND AFFORDABLE ART INSURANCE COVERAGE?

Your regular carrier might not have contacts in this area; However, Local art groups have to carry event insurance for their art shows. Get in touch with them and ask for a referral to their insurance carrier. The carrier they are using may be a lot less expensive than someone unfamiliar with this type of coverage.

QUESTIONS TO ASK THE CARRIER

What protection do I as a vendor need for my art and my possessions?  What protection do I need if someone is hurt within my stall? What protection does the venue carry for fire, theft, personal liability? What about fire or other damage caused by an accident in another person’s booth that then adversely affects mine? Ask all the “what if” questions you can think of and then make your own determination about participating. Also, check into whether there is an insurance contract and what the terms of the contract may be before signing and have your own insurance agent look it over first as well as an attorney if there are things you don’t understand. Never assume, always ask for clarifications and get them in writing.

If you are displaying your art someplace like a restaurant, gallery or other space, most likely you will need to make arrangements with the owner regarding theft or damage to your art. My carrier won’t cover my art outside my home unless I want to pay big bucks, which I can’t afford. A lot of art shows carry riders to this effect also.

INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR BOOTH EVENTS:

Questions concerning the actual amount and type of insurance you might need for a booth event (art fair, etc.) cannot be answered by anyone other than your insurance carrier. At a minimum you probably want some sort of theft and personal liability coverage but I don’t have any knowledge of what California requires or recommends. The venue holding the event may have requirements for coverage also; they may want a rider from your company naming them as an additional insured for the day of the event. Whatever their requirements are—get it in writing!

MURALISTS NOW NEED CONTRACTOR’S LICENSE

Published November 13, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

Most states regulate construction contractors. In California, the Contractors State License Board (CSLB) was created to protect consumers by licensing and regulating California’s construction industry. Visual Artists and visual art does not usually come under construction laws, however there is one facet of the visual art world that does: Murals. Wikipedia defines murals as any piece of artwork painted or applied directly on a wall ceiling or other large permanent surface. For instance if you are invited to paint a mural on the wall of your doctor’s office and you were paid more than $500,  under California construction laws, you might need a Contractor’s License. Artists may not be aware that they could be violating California state licensing laws if they were paid more than $500 to paint a mural on a permanent structure i.e. a house or office wall, outside building, etc… The C-33 Painting and Decorating license section covers painting a mural on a permanent structure. Individuals who limit their practice to that of an artist could also be covered under either D-64 (non-specialized contractor designation) or C-61 (Limited Specialty contractor classification).  If an artist is paid more than $500 (labor and materials) to paint a mural on a permanent structure, they are subject to state contractor licensing laws under the Business and Professions Code Section 7026. As of this year, there still is no license classification for specifically for an artist painting art on walls or buildings, so artists are forced to apply for the general painting contractor’s license.

Requirements for C-33 licensing can be pretty stiff (and expensive); you must pass the state law and business exam in addition to the trade exam related to painting. Cost:  Initial app fee $300, App to add a supplemental Classification $75, Home improvement salesperson (HIS) registration fee $75, etc… Then it has to be renewed each year.  In addition to the license itself, CSLB always requires worker’s comp insurance on most projects if anyone but you do any part of the work. Then there are the bond requirements for a General License;  “D” class licenses on the other hand may be less expensive to obtain since potential contactors are only required to pass the law and business exams. However, the tests themselves are quite complicated and most potential contractors actually take courses designed to help them pass the tests (this is not free either).

I don’t know if this could affect you if you merely provided the design for a mural and didn’t actually paint it or otherwise install it. I also don’t know if this covers the donated designs.

According to the latest CSLB newsletter, an increased number of inquiries and complaints from consumers about licensing requirements for artists creating murals have caused the CSLB to tighten up on enforcement in this area so watch out for stings!

For More info: California State Licensing Board    Contractors State License Board Protecting and informing consumers and contractors about proper contracting.

 

 

http://hubpages.com/hub/Muralists-Now-Need-Contractors-License

I AM AN ARTIST SO WHY WOULD I NEED A LAWYER?

Published November 6, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

It seems never to occur to most artists (with some notable exceptions) to have a lawyer look over the contract their new Gallery or licensing company wants them to sign. Why not? Well, a couple of reasons might be that the artist is just so thrilled to have an actual walk-in gallery or licensing firm offering to display or sell their work that the artist overlooks making sure their rights are protected, or that the artist simply can’t afford to hire an attorney.

There are several types of contracts an artist might be involved with.

A contract commissioning a piece of art.

A consignment contract with a gallery to sell your work,

A licensing agreement to sell prints, cards or commission work to be translated into other art forms (plates, tiles, textiles, etc.).

An agreement with an agent to sell or advertise your work.

An agreement with a venue (non-gallery) to display or sell your art.

Booth rental space at an event.

When are the times when you should have someone with legal experience take a look at what you are signing? Well, if you can afford it, anytime you want to be paid for your work, but if you are a starving artist, can you afford a $60/hour retainer? Probably not, however you do have some other options. If you ever find yourself in need of legal representation, you can try Lawyers for the Arts. Most states have either a volunteer lawyers for the arts organization or regular lawyers for the arts who if you ask for it will sometimes give you a bro bono consultation to see want you need.

Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts (VLA) is both a generic term for a number of legal service organizations located throughout the country. It is also the proper name of an organization in New York City, Founded in 1969. That organization is the oldest VLA in the United States. Many states also have their own non-profit organizations: In California, Bay Area Lawyers for the Arts (BALA) was founded in 1971. When BALA expanded to Southern California joining with Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts–Los Angeles, it was renamed California Lawyers for the Arts. There are more than 30 VLA programs spread around the states. Lawyers for the arts is not a single organization, but a network joined by similar vocations providing a range of free or low-cost legal services and educational programs to tackle the needs of artists and arts associations for all genres of art and artists

Each organization functions independently. Most of them are nonprofits  but some are affiliated with arts councils, arts service organizations, bar associations or business for the arts programs.

Several of the platforms include

  • Legal services through referrals and sometimes on-site consultations;
  • Some host legal clinics; alternative dispute resolution including mediation and arbitration;
  • accounting services;
  • Law student internships who are usually a lot less expensive to use and can overlook contracts;
  • Educational programs on topics like contracts, copyright, estate planning, taxes and nonprofit incorporation;
  • Most of them also carry publications on a broad range of issues.

In CALIFORNIA, if you are looking for an attorney, you can also go to: http://www.CaliforniaAttorneyReferral.com, or you can try someone from the list below:

Please keep in mind that some of the address and phone numbers may have changed. Since I have never used any of these firms, I have no idea of their quality, fees or abilities.

Even if you don’t see the need to have legal advice on every little thing, there are some issues you need to make sure are covered in any contract you enter into.

  • If this is a commission sale, when is to be completed and how soon afterwards are you paid?
  • Is the Gallery or Agent requiring exclusive rights?
  • When are payments due from consignment sales?
  • How long does the consignment last?
  • If there is a reception who pays for it?
  • Who hangs the art?
  • If the hanging causes damage who pays for the repairs?
  • If the gallery or venue goes out of business make sure your art cannot be considered part of the gallery assets or they could be sold to pay business debts in which case you won’t receive any payment for your work.

Disclaimer: The information in this blog is for general information purposes only; it is not intended to be tax or legal advice. Each situation is specific; consult your CPA or attorney to discuss your specific business questions.

 

ARE YOU READY TO SELL YOUR WORK OVER THE HOLIDAYS?

Published September 29, 2017 by Gail Daley Writer & Artist

The holidays are fast approaching, and with them comes craft fairs, booth events, and other ways to show and sell your work I call events where you bring your work out and set up a mini art gallery “Booth Events” because usually you will be selling your own work. As a rule, there are 3 types of these events Outdoor, Indoor and Tabletop. Some of these Events will be geared to sell art only; some will allow different types of vendors and you may find yourself set up next door to a food vendor. Outdoor events are usually larger than the Indoor ones and attract a larger crowd.  A Tabletop can be either indoors or outdoors; the main difference between a Tabletop and the others is the space size. Most booth events allow you a 10’ x 10’ space. With a tabletop you have a space about the length and width of a table (usually 8’ long by 3’ wide) to display your work.

Your booth set up should be light and portable, easy for one person to set up in about 20 minutes, and fit into your vehicle along with the products you are planning to sell. To take part in booth events you should have the following items:

OUTDOOR EVENT

Pop-Up booth: Pop-Ups come in several price ranges and styles. Ideally, you will have help setting it up, but I would recommend the E-Z Up brand with the white top because it can be set up by one person. If you have never set up a booth, I advise a couple of practice trials setting it up in your yard before you go out to the event. The best Pop-Ups for displaying art have white tops and straight sides. The white top provides more light to see the art and the straight sides give you somewhere to fasten display racks. You can also purchase sidewalls to hang from the sides of the booth. You will need these if you are taking part in an event that lasts several days; you can use the sidewalls to enclose the booth when you go home for the night. FYI, unless the event has very good security, I wouldn’t recommend leaving your work out, but you can leave your display stands set up inside.

Display stands or racks: You can buy display set-ups from the art supply catalogs; but these can be pricey. However, it is possible to make your own. I bought 8’ wire closet shelving from the local hardware store. Turned on end, they can be fastened together with plastic tie straps or Velcro. The wire bars make ideal places to hang different sizes of art. (This portable shelving can also be made into stand-alone shapes: boxes, triangles and rectangles). For all events, I suggest that sandbags or weighted milk cartons be fastened to the corners to prevent tipping and as additional security for stand-alone shapes.

Portable easels can also be used as a part of your display. The art supply catalogs have some excellent display easels that hold multiple pieces of art and they look very professional. You can also make display easels yourself out of copper, PVC pipe or wood; just make sure they look professional. Remember you are going to be carrying them so they should be very light-weight!

Small fold up tables with a nice tablecloth to hold your cash box and give you a hard surface when making out receipts. They can also be used to display very small or 3-deminsional art, cards, etc. Just don’t make your space so crowded buyers won’t enter it. In addition, if your work is light, cardboard boxes covered by tablecloths or white sheets that reach the ground look very professional and provide a good backdrop to show off your work.

Sandbags or weights to hold down the booth in case of high winds: Weights of some kind are a must. A Pop-Up booth makes a big kite when the wind blows and it doesn’t have to be hurricane strength either. You need about 20 to 30 lbs. on each corner. Many booth events are on blacktop so you can’t use the handy stakes that come with the Pop-Ups to secure your booth against winds. Sandbags are available either from the Art Supply warehouse where you got your Pop-Up, or from the hardware store where you can also obtain clean, dry sand. You can also fill empty gallon milk cartons and use the handle to fasten to the legs of the booth.

Cash box: a locking cash box to keep change for cash sales and checks can be bought at the local office supply store.

Chair to sit in; while you will be spending a lot of time on your feet, it’s nice to have a place to sit down and relax so potential buyers don’t think you are just waiting to pounce.

Your work and any other items you plan to sell: Plastic boxes with good, snap-lock lids work really well to transport small items. They are waterproof and if you are doing a lot of events they hold up much better than cardboard. If you are going to be carrying your product in a pickup bed, make sure the lids of the boxes are fastened down and won’t blow open (bungee cords work well here). You will need either bubble wrap or some type of padding to wrap around or separate delicate items. For larger pieces of art such as framed paintings or photographs, I recommend that you carry them inside your vehicle (in which case they can be separated by large pieces of foam board or cardboard to prevent scratching the frames), or wrapped in bubble wrap. The thing you are most looking to prevent is damage caused by the items moving around when you stop, start and turn the vehicle. I also carry either a large, wide-tip marker in either brown or black to touch up frames.

A hand truck or dolly: You may have park some distance from your booth set up. While most places allow you to drive into the event area to set up your display, it might not be feasible for you to do so. A hand truck or dolly will enable you to haul your art, display stands and Pop-Up into the area without having to transport everything a piece at a time. This is a big plus because you may have a limited time in which to set up your booth.

A way to take debit or credit cards: If you want to make sales over $20, you will need either an I-Pad, I-Phone or some other brand of smart phone and the APP enabling either Square technology or PayPal. Both companies provide  a small square you can order off the internet free, attach it your smart phone  or tablet It’s small, portable and easy to learn to use. The company takes a small percentage of each sale as a fee (2.75% per swipe) and the money is in your account the next day. The site is https://squareup.com/  or https://paypal.com check it out. Although other companies are beginning to develop this tech these both have a proven track record.

Sales Receipts, a calculator and bags: A receipt book is a handy way for you to keep track of cash sales. Don’t spend a lot on the bags; you can get small paper bags and larger plastic ones with handles at the local Dollar Store. A small printing calculator because some customers who buy large ticket items are going to want a printed receipt, even if you are also e-mailing them one.

INDOOR EVENT

Requirements for an Indoor event will be slightly different. Some indoor events will allow you a 10 x 10 area, but you may find the spaces allotted aren’t exactly that size or aren’t square, so there will be difficulty fitting the Pop-Up frame into the space. In addition, the top cover will keep the overhead lighting from coming through, and the ceiling in the room may not be high enough to accommodate your booth. Even if the cover is white, poor lighting will make your booth dark and unattractive. if the canvas or vinyl cover is removable and the ceiling is tall enough, you might still be able to use only the Pop-Ups frame.

Stand-alone display racks are best for an indoor event. I use the same 8’ wire closet shelving from the local hardware store I used for the outdoor event, except that I fasten them together in a shape instead of to the booth. An indoor event is more likely to be crowded than an outdoor one, so to prevent accidents if your display is bumped, I suggest that sandbags or weighted milk cartons be fastened inside the shape to prevent tipping if someone does bump into the display. However, you can purchase this type of display from Art Supply catalogs and warehouses.

If you use portable easels to display your work, they can serve the same function indoors as they did outdoors.

You will also be able to use the small tables with a nice tablecloth used in your outdoor display

TABLETOPS

If you do a lot of Church or School sponsored Boutiques, a Tabletop Event is the most common type. At a Tabletop, you are probably going to be given just enough space to set up one 8’x2.5’ table with room for a chair behind it, so be prepared to cut your display down and bring only what you consider the most “sellable” items.

When I go to an event, especially an Indoor event, I always ask for access to electricity. Since space is usually at a premium it is difficult to display a lot of large art so I seldom take many large pieces of art to these events anymore, instead I take a plug-in digital picture frame (you can do the same with either a laptop or a tablet) loaded with photos of my work. I have a power point presentation showing my work set to music. The moving slide show and music attract a lot of attention and I can display more art.

Remember to have fun and talk about your work.

Good Luck

Gail

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